Biomedical Computer Science and Mechatronics

MSMI Analysis


 

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Using InShape models for image analysis and parameter prediction

One major applicaiton of InShape models is the automatic segmentation of images. However, InShape models have also been sucessfully used for the assessment of pathogenetic factors, which manifest in variations of the appearance of an organ and also for the automatic prediction of biomechanical parameters. For this purpose, InShape models offer the possibility of using information about the geometrical variations as well as variations concerning the inner structure/appearance of an organ. For more details on the developed methods and algorithms that have been developed at the IBIA and MSMI, please also refer to the corresponding publications.

 

Analysis of the proximal femur in (clinical) CT data

Assessment of individual fracture risk and pathogenetic factors in CT images of femur specimen with clinical resolution

Assessing the individual risk for femoral neck fractures of a patient in CT images provides information that is necessary to start a therapeutic intervention on time. Hence, the number of femoral neck fractures and especially the complications after necessary surgical interventions could possibly be decreased. Some of the underlying methods and algorithms were developed in the course of the project "Local Bone Analysis, X-Ray and CT Analysis".

 

Regions of interest that were placed automatically for the assessment of the individual fracture risk using CT images

 

 

Predicted versus real faliure load (~fracture risk) of 86 specimen

 

Principal components that describe variations, which are relevant  for the individual fracture risk of a patient using InShape models. Relevant geometrical variations as well as variations concerning the inner structure/appearance could be identified.

 

 

Assesment of local bone quality of the proximal femur

Relevant structural variations that influence local bone quality could be identified and quantified. Having quantitative information about the local bone quality prior to a surgical intervention helps the surgeon to plan the intervention and might therefore reduce the risk of complications after the intervention (e.g. implant cut out) For this purpose CT images with clinical resolution as well as radiographs have been used.

 

CT images

Strcutural variations, which are relevant for the assessment of the local bone quality inside a spherical region in the femoral head (location of the tip of a dynamic hip screw (DHS)) as described by the InShape models (also compare to the images below)

 

Actual variations that can be observed in CT data of specimen with low local bone quality and high local bone quality

 

 

Radiographs

Strcutural variations, which are relevant for the assessment of the local bone quality inside a spherical region in the femoral head (location of the tip of a dynamic hip screw (DHS)) as described by the InShape models (also compare to the images below)

 

Actual variations that can be observed in CT data of specimen with low local bone quality and high local bone quality

 

  

Analysis of the ventricular movement of healthy and diseased patients (pilot study)

Endocardial movement (between 0 ms and 100 ms of the cardia cycle) of a healthy heart (left) and the heart of a patient suffering from cardiomypathy (right) in 2 different views.

 

Local cardiac movement (part of left ventricle) of 2 healthy hearts (left, middle) and one heart after "simulated" myocardial infarction (right) mapped onto one reference subject for better comparison 

 

Contact:

Karl D. Fritscher, MD, PhD 
Head of the Research Group
Room: G3 41
Tel: +43-50-8648-3866
Fax: +43-50-8648-673866
karl.fritscher@umit.at